3 Exercises to start the year

The Dead lift – ALWAYS REMEMBER SAFETY FIRST

Common Mistakes

  1. When performing the dead lift, the most common mistakes stem from the over exuberance of what is perceived to be a suitable weight to lift. Please note: if you are unable to lift the barbell comfortably off the rack, the weight you have chosen is too much. Also remembering that the weight you now are now holding, you should be able to perform between 12 and 15 repetitions (more on that point shortly).
  2. Much like the squat most people will lead with their back rather than the legs / lower body. The tendency is to start the lift from the upper body and finishing off with the lower body.

WRONG! As per the squat, imagine you are sitting on a chair and are preparing to stand. (Actually do this now), when you start (to) stand, take note: what is the first thing that moves? If you are unsure that’s okay simply repeat and you may even wish to do this side on to a mirror, that way you can more accurately determine what’s moving when.

What you will note from this simple example is that the legs start to move first! That is, the angle of your back should be no lower than about 45 degrees and can be as ‘tall’ as up to 60 degrees.

IMPORTANT: if the angle of your back is repeatedly lower than 45 degrees DO NOT DO THIS EXERCISE, PLEASE CONSULT A QUALIFIED PHYSIOTHERAPIST AND/OR CHIROPRACTOR OR AN OSTEOPATH.

  1. Rushing to finish – recalling from our video, slower is better. The simple philosophy of less is (imo always) more. What does this mean and why? Rushing = increased room for error and ultimately unsafe (not acceptable –period). The why may be demonstrated by noting the following:

When going into the deadlift position, either at the midpoint/position and/or during the upward movement, towards the start/finish position of the deadlift, do you have or experience any of the following?

a.     Low back pain?

    1. Knees buckling in and/or out?
      More pressure on either one both balls of your feet?
      Your upper body has had a better workout than your lower body?

If you have answered YES, to one or more of the above you may potentially be rushing through this exercise. As a point of interest, you may wish to observe how others in your fitness centre perform the deadlift.

Now for all you folks out there who are on a quest to learn how more about this exercise, please me an email here, for your personal response and guide.

3 quick tips to help improve your squat now!

  1. Stretch your hamstrings out (which may help to increase range)
  2. Stretch your calves out that include both upper and lower calves!
  3. Support your spine, keeping the head up eyes looking straight ahead